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    November 9, 2017

    Facebook requests nude images in a bid to fight revenge porn

    facebook revenge porn

    Facebook has reportedly sought nude images of its users in a bid to prevent the spread of revenge porn on its core services.

    Revenge porn is one of the key challenges Facebook has yet to conquer in establishing the rule of law through its community guidelines on its core platforms, and now the firm has made an unusual move with the intent of mitigating the scourge in entirety.

    The Australia Broadcasting Corporation reports that Facebook is now testing a pre-emptive method for blocking the unauthorized proliferation of nude photos on the site which involves requesting nude images from its users.

    Read: Facebook’s research team has found a way to turn your face into an avatar with just one photo

    Though the news may sound worrying, the implications of the initiative could be promising in preventing the trauma or hurt created by the sharing of unauthorized nude images.

    In the event users are worried that their intimate images might be shared without their consent, Facebook’s new test program allows users to upload their such media to Messenger, wherein users can assess the uploaded content and ‘hash’ media for future reference.

    Once that is done, Facebook’s image algorithms would monitor the prevalence of such images across the company’s services and could potentially block such media automatically once detected – minimising the spread of confidential content and mitigating damage to one’s character.

    Faceb00k has partnered with Australia’s e-Safety Commissioner Julie Inman Grant to trial the program, where the former has emphatically assured users that Facebook will not store the compromising images in question, but would rather retain a ‘digital footprint’ of such media.

    For those worried further about their privacy while using the service, the program remains entirely consensual.

    The bid could prove a positive endeavour on Facebook’s part to mitigate the spread of confidential or compromising information on its services, and further to other Facebook-owned platforms in the near future.

    Read: Facebook will now display ads from physical stores you’ve visited

    What are your thoughts? Be sure to let us know your opinion in the comments below!

    Follow Bryan Smith on Twitter: @bryansmithSA

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